Isla Craig, Scottish island from where curling stones come from and similar in shape

Isla Craig, Scottish island from where curling stones come from and similar in shape

With full points in the first four rounds of Beijing 2022, the blues of curling rekindle the lights on one of the ice family’s most eager sports. And then it is worth noting the origin of “stones”, round stones with handles, used by athletes, even these completely out of the ordinary characteristics. To begin with, they all come from a small island off the coast of Scotland, Isla Craig, an uninhabited natural park that has been a quarry, the sole builders of which, the Cage family, have carved the stones since 1851. And even more curiously, it also has the shape of a crushed panettone.

Only on this island, Kennedy’s private property, but leased to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds until 2050, two granites are used, “Blue Hone” and “Common Green”, the first being the most valuable. Is. The composition of the two granites is particularly waterproof, and the reason they are preferred lies in their greater resistance to cracking after the aggressive action of water, which splits the stone from solidification. The status of a protected island allows the Scottish producer, Kees, to mine the rocks in limited quantities and only every 10 years: the last, in 2013, received 2,000 tonnes. Keez stones are the only ones officially recognized by both the World Curling Federation and the IOC.

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