New records admitted to San Joaquin County COVID-19 Hospital

New records admitted to San Joaquin County COVID-19 Hospital

COVID-19 hospital admissions in San Joaquin County have reached new records, with 4.5% ICU capacity reported in the entire 12-county San Joaquin area. San Joaquin County health officials are reporting that it has 267 Covid-19 patients in seven hospitals – up from the previous peak demand of 262 patients in July. Seven hospitals in the county are also reporting that the ICU is at 118% capacity and 56% of all ICU patients are receiving treatment for Covid-19. KCRA 3 San Joaquin County Public Health Officer Dr. Maggie talked to Park. Below is an excerpt from the interview. KCRA3: Now when it comes to ICU capacity in the Sun Joaquin area, it is in one issue. How do the last ten months of this epidemic compare? Dr. Park: It’s a serious situation. There were only 1.9% ICU beds left in our San Joaquin Valley yesterday. As a field we are back today through ..%. That’s still a very small number. KCRA3: The ICU capacity around your seven hospitals in San Joaquin County is 118%. What does it really mean? Dr. Park: All we need is numbers presented by each of our seven hospitals – as far as how many staffed ICU beds are available and how many are in use. KCRA3: What if a car crashes? Have a heart attack or have a severe COVID-19 patient and need an ICU bed ક્યાં where do they go? Dr. Park: Well, we don’t want anyone to hesitate to go to their local, nearest emergency department. Our hospitals are ready for you and we don’t want anyone waiting for a symptom or having a medical emergency. Knows how to move around patients. We have regional – a lot of agreements, a lot of partnerships, and we can make room. We also have state-level access to Sleep Train Arena as an alternative care site. Therefore, we can set some of our patient loads in a way that makes sense. And that is why the state is paying attention to the territories because we depend on our territory to support us. And sometimes we go to our Greater Sacramento area. But if you notice, both regions are now on stay-at-home order due to the low ICU count and that’s why it’s serious. Because we depend on each other for it. But when it gets too low, sometimes help doesn’t come. Park: Therefore, many of these cases represent community spread. And the classical meaning of community transmission is that people just don’t know. It’s just out there. So, COVID has a really high transmission rate right now. And most people, when we approach a trace, don’t know exactly where it came from. So, it’s really number one. KCRA3: What worries you the most? Dr. Park: It’s hard to say we’re back home. But what worries me right now is that people aren’t taking it so seriously around the way we went back in March. And so, I’m worried that after the end of the year we’re seeing January which is probably worse than our December.

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COVID-19 hospital admissions in San Joaquin County have reached new records, with 4.5% ICU capacity reported in the entire 12-county San Joaquin area.

San Joaquin County health officials are reporting that it has 267 Covid-19 patients in seven hospitals – up from the previous peak demand of 262 patients in July.

Seven hospitals in the county are also reporting that the ICU is at 118% capacity and 56% of all ICU patients are receiving treatment for Covid-19.

KCRA 3 San Joaquin County Public Health Officer Dr. Maggie talked to Park. Below is an excerpt from the interview.

KCRA3: Now when it comes to ICU capacity in the Sun Joaquin area, it is in one issue. How do the last ten months of this epidemic compare?

Dr. Park: It is a serious situation. There were only 1.9% ICU beds left in our San Joaquin Valley yesterday. As a field we are back today through ..%. That’s still a very small number.

KCRA3: The ICU capacity around your seven hospitals in San Joaquin County is 118%. What does it really mean?

Dr. Park: What we are seeing is being presented by each of our seven hospitals – as far as how many staffed ICU beds are available and how many are in use.

KCRA :: Someone has a car accident, has a heart attack or has a serious covid-1 patient and they need an ICU bed, where do they go?

Dr. Park: Well, we don’t want anyone to hesitate to go to their local, nearest emergency department. Our hospitals are ready for you and we do not want anyone waiting for symptoms or having a medical emergency.

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Our ICU knows how to move patients around. We have regional – lots of contracts, lots of partnerships, and we can make room. We also have state-level access to Sleep Train Arena as an alternative care site. Therefore, we can make some of our patient loads meaningful in that way.

And that is why the state is paying attention to the territories because we depend on our territory to support us. And sometimes we go to our Greater Sacramento area. But if you notice, both regions are now on stay-at-home order due to the low ICU count and that’s why it’s serious. Because we depend on each other for it. But when it gets too low, sometimes help doesn’t come.

KCRA3: Mostly attributed to these cases?

Dr. Park: Therefore, many of these cases represent community spread. And the classical meaning of community transmission is that people just don’t know. It’s just out there. So, COVID has a really high transmission rate right now. And most people, when we approach a trace, don’t know exactly where it came from. So, it’s really number one.

KCRA3: What worries you the most?

Dr. Park: It’s hard to say we’re back in order to stay home. But what worries me right now is that people aren’t taking it so seriously at the same time we were back in March.

And so, I’m worried that after the end of the year we’re looking for January that could be even worse than our December.

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