Outlander player Sam Hugon is proving to be a true Scottish despite his French, German and Norwegian ancestry.

Outlander player Sam Hugon is proving to be a true Scottish despite his French, German and Norwegian ancestry.

Despite his French, German and Norwegian ancestry, Outlander Sam Hugan has proven himself to be a true Scot.

While Sam talked about his upbringing and his roots in Scotland, he talked about his plans to expand his line of tweed and tartan to include skirts and skirts in addition to scarves.

The 40-year-old actor was born in the historic counties of Dumfries and Galloway in Kirkcudbrightshire in Balmcklen and has spoken of a “very idealistic childhood”.

Referring to his television series Men in Kilts, Sam said, “I grew up in a castle country in Scotland: this is a full Scottish childhood, but I can see how it could have been different so I could take that opportunity.” Thankful for being Scottish and maybe that’s why. I wanted to share it with this proposal. “

Sam, who grew up in a converted stables in Kenmore Castle grounds, said, “As I looked at my family and where I was from, I discovered the mix I had with my ancestors.”

“I have a French, German and Norwegian. Think of all the roads your family could take and in the end I was Scottish. “

Sam, who posted a new picture of his rough and ready character on his Instagram from SAS: Red Notices, first showed his goodies on Instagram in December in “The Sasenach”, which he believes “Scotland Inspired by his love for “.

At the time, luggage included scarves, whiskey bottles, T-shirts and bags.

Sam announced to The Rake magazine that he now plans to expand the line to include more wearables, including skirts and skirt options.

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He explained, “I didn’t know what my family was and what the tartan was, so I thought, why not do something that everyone can participate in?”

“Just seeing how weavers make them – this is a great tradition in Scotland. It is really important to support this craft and that is what makes Britain a really good, great heritage and artisan. “

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