Van Gogh’s Sunflowers Got Indurated by Just Stop Oil Activists

Van Gogh's Sunflowers Got Indurated by Just Stop Oil Activists

Here we go again. Two activists of the ecological group this morning just stop the oilfamous painting smeared Sunflower by Van Gogo placed on National Gallery in London Against the anti-oil campaign.

British media reported this, also circulating video of the attack on the opera: two young girls, both wearing a white T-shirt with the inscription, entered the museum just stop the oil, Throw the contents of two cans of tomato soup on the picture. Then, they “glue” their hands to the wall under the dirty work, so as to be filmed smiling, with the other hand holding the ministerial package open.

Turning to the other people in the room, one of them asked if art was more valuable than life, food, and justice. They then asked who was in the room if they were more concerned with protecting a painting than the planet and the people who lived in it.
“The cost of life’s woes is part of the cost of the oil crisis – activist Phoebe Plummer continued – millions of people can’t even afford to heat a can of soup, he said, from the ground he had just thrown over . Paintings”.

Sunflower It is one of five volumes painted by a Dutch artist from the National Gallery and the London canvas has an estimated value of 80 million euros. Thankfully, the famous sunflower is unlikely to be harmed by the gesture, as the painting is protected by a glass panel.

countryside just stop the oilLaunched against backward steps in climate emergency policy, blamed on the Tory government of Liz Truss, has been going on for days in the UK and hit-and-run action against public places and transport by radical activists.

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This is not the first time that activists and activists have just stop the oil They organize protests in museums to try to create awareness on issues related to the environmental crisis caused by human activities. Last July, the two of them affixed a hand to the painting’s frame hay cart From John ConstableAlso in the National Gallery, while others did the same in various museums in Scotland and England.
Whether this is useful remains to be seen.

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