Top 10 | Canadiens seventh round selection

  Top 10 |  Canadiens seventh round selection

Of all the players drafted by the Canadiens in 2014, only Jake Evans, the seventh and final round pick, established himself in the NHL in Montreal. They are rare, but they can sometimes provide valuable services to an organization. Here are the organization’s top 10 seventh-round picks.


Mathias Bruneta

Mathias Bruneta
press

10 Vladislav Tretak 1983

Photo Pierre Coty archives the press

Vladislav Tretak, in December 1982

Although he has never played in the NHL, Tretiac remains the most famous seventh-round pick in Canadian history! Tretack had close ties with Montreal, and Serge Savard risked fishing him, even though the Iron Curtain was impenetrable with the communist world, but the Russians, one of the greatest guardians of all time, were never able to leave. Didn’t succeed. Soviet bloc at that time.

9 Rafael Harvey-Pinard 2019

Photo archives the press of Graham Hughes, Canada

Rafael Harvey-Pinard, in Rocket de Laval uniform, on February 27th.

The future will tell whether Harvey-Pinard can find a long-term spot in the NHL in a supporting role, but already, the late 20’s draft condition has paid off, as the Quebecer scored his first career goal at the Nationals. Did. The Hockey League in its opening match last Tuesday night in Tampa.

8 Peter Sullivan 1971

Image provided by O-Pee-Chi

Peter Sullivan

Peter Sullivan never broke into a super-powerful team in Montreal despite a 104-point season in 77 games with the school club in Nova Scotia, but he had a prolific career with the team in Winnipeg. Most Powerful in the World Association, then merged with the NHL

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7 Cayden Primo 2017

Photo Francois Roy, Press Archives

kaiden primou

When Primo was still available, the Canadian had no seventh-round pick, but he cared for the youngster and received one of the flyers the following year with a seventh-round pick. Primo is not set in the NHL, but represents a bright prospect.

6 Richard Sevigny 1977

Photo Armand Trottier archives the press

Richard Sevigny is assisted by his defender Gilbert Delorme during a game against the Detroit Red Wings at the Montreal Forum in November 1981.

This Sherbrooke Beaver goaltender was the second goaltender produced by a Canadian that year, after a certain Robert Holland. He played five seasons in Montreal between 1979 and 1984, the last two teaming up with Rick Wemsley, with the delicate task of forgetting Ken Dryden.

5 Jake Evans 2014

Photo Eric Bolte, archives USA Today Sports

Jake Evans during a game against the Los Angeles Kings at Bell Center on November 9

Jake Evans already scored more than twice that year’s first round pick Nikita Sherbach. It took longer to develop, but now it seems to be located at the center of the third line in Montreal.

4 Sergei Kostitsin 2005

Photo Bernard Broult, Press Archives

Sergei Kostitsin, in March 2010

The youngest of the Kostitsin brothers showed great promise early in his career, scoring 8 points in 12 series games in his first season in 2008, but his lack of discipline off the ice cost him a great career. He still had 50 points in 77 games in his first campaign in Nashville, but was dropped from the National League a few years later.

3 Stephen Robidas 1995

Photo Denis Courville, archives press

Stephen Robidas, in October 1999

Stephen Robidas had a slightly more illustrious career than Lyle Odellin’s, but he played just two seasons in Montreal, before concluding in Dallas, where he spent most of his career in a leading role.

2 Lyle Odellin 1986

Photo Bernard Broult, Press Archives

Lyle Odellin, in March 1993

The first round pick in 1986 was Mark Pedersen and it was a resounding failure. The modest Saskatchewan defenseman drafted 125 lines down the line, playing 1056 games for his toughness and reliability in the NHL, more than half of which in Montreal, where he quickly became a crowd favorite.

1 Tom Curvers 1981

Photo Denis Courville, archives press

Tom Kurvers is seen by Brent Ashton during a game between the Canadians and the Nordics at the Montreal Forum in January 1985.

After two very promising first seasons from 1984 to 1986, this offensive defenseman was unfortunately traded too early for a second-round pick at Buffalo. He had his best season in New Jersey in 1988–1989 with 66 points in 71 games. Last summer, he died of cancer at the age of only 58.

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