Kraken Security Lab used fake fingerprints to trick MacBook and iPad biometric scanners. They were made of acetate film and PVA glue.

  Kraken Security Lab used fake fingerprints to trick MacBook and iPad biometric scanners.  They were made of acetate film and PVA glue.


Researchers at cybersecurity company Kraken Security Lab have found a relatively simple way to create fake fingerprints that can dodge the widely used biometric scanners in modern mobile devices. They Having saidWho have successfully tried this method on MacBook Pro, iPad and some other devices.

In short, everything is exactly as it is in the spy thriller, except that the Kraken Security Lab methodology eliminates the need for expensive equipment and consumables. As the study authors say, a photo of $5 is enough for a victim’s fingerprint and consumables to create a fake print.

Kraken Security Lab used fake fingerprints to trick MacBook and iPad biometric scanners.  They were made of acetate film and PVA glue.

Experts at Kraken Security Lab took a photo of a fingerprint for the experiment and desaturated it using a graphic editor. He then printed the print on acetate film using a laser printer. This made it possible to make the print volumetric, and the rest was done with the usual PVA glue. After coating with a thin layer and subsequent drying, the print “came to life”. It was like this:

“We were able to successfully replicate this well-known attack on most of the tested devices, including the iPad and MacBook Pro. If we use this method for a real attack, we could end up with a huge amount of confidential information. “

Quoted by Kraken Security Lab pc magazine

Last April, Expert Cisco Talos Security Group shared the results of a similar experiment on obtaining fingerprints in different ways – directly from a person and from a digital database or from objects and surfaces that the device owner touched. Then the authors of the experiment said that in 80% of cases they managed to bypass the biometric security in the smartphone.

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