After teenager’s illegal abortion, Messenger will go secret in 2023

After teenager's illegal abortion, Messenger will go secret in 2023

The hashtag #DeleteFacebook has been reintroduced since early August. The protests were sparked by the network’s contribution to a US court investigation into the illegal abortion of a teenage girl. Private messages, the basis of the allegations, were exchanged between a teenager and her mother.

Celeste Burgess, a 17-year-old American, has been charged in Nebraska, Nebraska, of performing an abortion after the legal term of twenty weeks of pregnancy, which remains in force to this day. According to United States Justice, she may have resorted to the abortion pill at 28 weeks after fertilization. Meanwhile, his mother is being prosecuted for “aborting after 20 weeks of pregnancy”, “aborting by an unauthorized doctor” and “hiding a human body”, with the fetus illegally buried by two women. has gone.

Mark Zuckerberg’s company defends itself from these allegations by making sure it was not aware of the actual contents of the investigation.

In the midst of a storm following this collaboration with police, Facebook tries to appease its users and indicates that it is working on Messenger’s default end-to-end encryption, for 2023.

Unlike WhatsApp, another subsidiary of Facebook, or even Signal Messaging, Messenger doesn’t have this encryption on by default: it’s an option to be activated.

End-to-end encryption is a communication system where only the people communicating can read the messages exchanged. In theory, this prevents electronic eavesdropping by telecommunications providers and Internet service providers. With end-to-end encryption, no one is able to access the cryptographic keys needed to decrypt the conversation. The system is designed to resist any attempt at surveillance or tampering. For example, companies that offer end-to-end encryption are unable to give authorities a decrypted version of their customers’ messages.

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