TU Graz brings AI to the countryside in a playful way

TU Graz brings AI to the countryside in a playful way

Artificial intelligence – many also use the English expression artificial intelligence (AI) – is in the process of rapidly transforming our economy and production methods. Gerald Steinbauer-Wagner of the Institute of Software Technology at Graz University of Technology is convinced that knowledge and skills in the field of AI are becoming increasingly important for young people’s training and further professional careers; But when it comes to the opportunities and risks of technology, all social and age groups should have their say and be able to make decisions.

basic understanding required

“People who are not familiar with the subject may not benefit from it or consider the extent to which the rules are useful and necessary for the use of artificial intelligence,” says the Graz expert. Therefore, a basic understanding is needed, and this is what the Community Workshops want to convey: “We want to provide the basics so that everyone can immerse themselves and have their say in the subject of artificial intelligence.”

no basic knowledge required

What is Artificial Intelligence, how does it work in everyday life, what it can do, what it can’t, what it should be able to do and what it can’t? These are questions that need to be discussed in a variety of ways with participants in community workshops. The basic methods of this technique are dealt with in small agile units. “No basic knowledge required,” insists the Graz project manager.

“We come on the phone”

Free workshops will be offered in the Styrian regions from now until the end of the year; The number of participants can range from five to 30 people. “We come on call – whether in community offices, schools or parish halls. From grandchildren to grandparents, everyone is welcome who want to take one and a half to three hours to learn AI technologies,” Steinbauer -Wagner says – they are working closely with the Austrian Computer Society (OCG) and the Mobilis Science Center. The Hungarian Gyor behind a program called Enaris (Education and Awareness for Intelligent Systems).

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TU Graz has already developed a training and certification system with partner institutions in Austria and the Hungarian Szczeciny István University in Gyr. Young people can use this to obtain an internationally recognized and modular “driving license” for Robotics and Artificial Intelligence (European Driving License for Robots and Intelligent Systems, EDLRIS).

To introduce this in schools, the initiative, which is funded by the Interreg Fund, has already developed teaching materials for teachers and trained nearly 300 teachers. The three-day certification course for teachers will continue to be offered. Free learning material is provided for basic digital education.

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